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If you sell anything, you have most likely seen an ad from the one and only, Tai Lopez.

He's probably the greatest self-promoter since PT Barnum.

I first stumbled upon Tai like everyone else, with his ad which has since been referred to as: "Here in my garage."

 

 

After clicking onto to one of Tai's sites, you can guarantee you're going to be seeing his ads for months and years to come.

This ad were discussing today drove over 600 million views (according to Tai), and God only knows how much revenue for the young entrepreneur.

The ad was so successful that is drove a steady stream of parody videos, some in good taste, and some dripping with jealousy and bitterness.

Tai sells a number of offerings, such as courses to improve your life (67 Steps), Social Media courses and most recently, a private mentorship with Tai and his A-List of other self-made millionaire friends.

A lot of people have referred to Tai as a scam "artist", and mostly because he uses beautiful women in his ads (so does every professional sport), as well as expensive cars (so does every self-help guru since Alan Weiss).

He also came under fire when he was accused of leasing his expensive cars, and renting hi $100,000/month home in Beverly Hills. You got it, people actually called him a "fraud because he leases expensive cars and rents a $100,000/month home....

Nevertheless, the ad was a HUGE success driving 67,686,963 views from September 2015 to August 1, 2017 (nearly 2 years). That's more than 4xs the amount of people that watched the last Presidential debate online!

The ad begins with Tai talking about how he just got a new Lamborghini; however, he loves gaining "KNOWLEDGE" even more.

He then goes on to say at one time in his life, he was broke, and luckily, he bumped into a mentor who helped him learn how to be successful.

He encourages people to then click his website to learn the big 3 things mentors taught him, that people can begin implementing to improve their lives.

Now, there are a few things we can deduce from the sheer volume of times we have all seen this ad:

  1. Tai must have tested a number of versions of this ad to determine which drove more website visits.
  2. This was probably Tai's best performing ad because this is the one nearly every one of his fans has seen
  3. Tai had a huge ad budget to run this ad to so many people, so often

A few people have asked me if Tai is a "fraud."

I don't think so at all.

I've learned a great deal from his videos, including how to speed read and drive more of a following which helped me sellout my last seminar.

Regarding his advice on reading, I learned how to read 5 books a week (roughly 250/year) versus my previous pace (50/year). So in my opinion, he adds a lot of value to the online conversation.

How Was His Ad So Successful?

Tai has certainly mastered the key to running a successful ad campaign.

Clearly his goal was two-fold:

  1. Create an iron-clad promise to improve people's condition
  2. Get people to his website, so he can sign them up for an email list, and ad retargting (ads you see after you have visited a website)

Also, because only certain markets of people will be looking to learn his advice, his retargting ads avoids wasteful spending on people that are probably not interested in what Tai has to teach/sell.

This is why the conversion rate for retargeting ads is ALWAYS higher than targeting ads.

Tai's ad was so successful because of the following 4 reasons:

  1. Tai established authenticity by making the video with an iPhone. People have come to loathe the "staged" insincerity of high-dollar video production the way they loathe stock photography. This makes Tai appear sincere, authentic, spontaneity and exciting.
  2. Tai established leadership and expert status on success by the admission of just purchasing a new Lamborghini. Most people watching the ad would be happy just to have a positive bank balance for 45 days straight, and if Tai is buying new cars, clearly he has something they can learn to improve their lives.
  3. Tai appears smart in his glasses giving him more intellectual credibility. I'm sure tested whether he should wear glasses or contacts, and at the end of the day, glasses will always make people appear smarter.
  4. Tai is offering to give people the 3 pieces of advice his mentors gave to him, that helped him get where he is today. If you believe Tai, then there is no doubt you are clicking his website to learn what he is ready to teach. This is a simple, yet DEADLY effective value proposition. Also, the idea of only "3 things" to make you successful is too simple and fast to pass up!

So, what you see here is the true anatomy of an effective ad in 2017:

  1. Establish yourself as an expert with evidence. Tai used his new Lamborghini as well as his large bookshelves dripping with books the watcher may recognize.
  2. Offer to give people something of value, in exchange for their contact information, so you can sell them offerings later. Tai is offering the 3 pieces of advice that made him successful.
  3. Be authentic in ways your competition isn't. Tai used an iPhone to film himself. You almost feel like he is in your room, speaking directly to you.
  4. Spend money to advertise. Tai must have spent millions of dollars advertising to people. In order to sell, you must advertise.

Overall, I love Tai's ads. He not only gives great advice, but his advertising is so effective, that it's a virtual advertising textbook in action.

Don't compete — DOMINATE.

 

Matt Steffen

"Don't compete -- DOMINATE!"

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Matt Steffen was Listed by Forbes as the #1 Marketing Consultant Who Avoids the B.S.

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