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HOW TO PROMOTE ANYTHING TO ANYONE

Watch Me Explain The Power of Sub-Branding that Allows Your Company to be the Master at Everything

You Cannot Be Everything to Everyone... Unless You Do This

If you want to sell everything to everyone, you must individually sub-brand each solution directly to the people you're serving, and the problem you're solving.

For example, the Holiday Inn wished to launch a new string of luxury hotels called "CROWNE PLAZA."

It wasn't long until people were complaining about the prices because they had grown used to the lower prices of a Holiday Inn.

Also, people didn't believe the Holiday Inn was capable of producing a luxury hotel because they had only produced low-cost efficiency hotels in the past.

As a result, Holiday Inn decided to conceal their company name in all future branding and marketing efforts, and very quickly, the Crowne Plaza took-off as a premier destination for traveling professionals.

The Holiday Inn realized people associated their brand with low prices, and so they needed a new (Sub) Brand to promote a luxury hotel.

Toyota deliberately does not add their logo to their Lexus cars.

This is because, according to Toyota, in the minds of the market, Toyota summons feelings of low cost fuel efficient cars for the masses.

Not exactly the recipe for a luxury brand.

However, when Toyota wants people to think of Lexus, they want people to think of an even more fuel-efficient, roomier, luxury vehicle that only the upper class can afford.

A new Prius costs anywhere from $23,475. A very nice, fuel efficient low cost vehicle for the masses!

A new Lexus costs around $37,825. Clearly Toyota has intended Lexus to be their luxury sub-brand.

The key to selling specific solutions to specific people is going to rely on your ability to brand each of your diverse solutions individually.

Take a look at some of the products Proctor and Gamble (P&G) produces, promotes and individually brands:

P&G also has an individual website for each brand as well.

Also, P&G retains the ability for each brand to go as deep as possible for each individual solution it serves.

For example, there are several different types of Head and Shoulders to choose from, all with specific solutions to dandruff.

Why Sub-Branding Is Critical to Your Marketing

Take a look at these 2 screen captures from 2 different law firm websites.

The "blue" firm offers Criminal Law, Personal Injury, Real Estate Law and Family Law.

The "green" firm has one brand and one specialty: Personal Injury.

This firm has less than 10 attorneys, and almost 3x's more legal "specialties" than legal staff.

This firm wants to own personal injury, so who would you hire if you slipped and fell (other things being equal)?

The "blue" firm has done a great job of showing they are the Jack of all Trades, master of none!

The green firm is just like P&G, in that they go very deep on this brand, offering multiple types of personal injury legal services.

The blue firm could easily be just as specialized, and attractive to specific markets by using Sub-Brands.

After all, for all we know, the green firm is offering just as many legal services as the blue firm, but they could be Sub-Branding each one!

How to Sub-Brand Your Business

So, now you have the job of branding each of your offerings, based on price, location, specialty, etc.

This task is no different than branding your original company.

However, now you have the ability to create a specific brand name, logo, website and ads that own your particular market, and solutions.

For example:

> If you offer music lessons to adults and kids, now you can offer these separately, and only offer lessons to kids on certain days, and adults on others. Then create one marketing program to reach the kids (parents), and another to reach adults looking for lessons.

> If you sell car parts and boat parts, create one marketing program for the car parts, and one for the boat parts.

> If you sell tree removal and landscaping services, create one marketing program for the landscaping, and one for tree removal.

> If you have caretakers for the elderly and the injured, create one marketing program for elderly caretakers and another for the injury caretakers.

> If you do commercial and residential heating and air conditioning, create one marketing program for commercial and another for the residential.

You can promote anything to anyone, but it must seem as though the solution being promoted was made primarily for one problem, and one group of people.

Yes, of course you can find some success being a Jack of all Trades, but not nearly as much as much as you can find being a perceived Master of ONE. Just ask Proctor and Gamble.

Make your marketing and branding the leader of everything you do, because everything else is a swap meet.

WANT MORE ADVICE LIKE THIS EVERY SINGLE WEEK?

You Cannot Be Everything to Everyone... Unless You Do This

If you want to sell everything to everyone, you must individually sub-brand each solution directly to the people you're serving, and the problem you're solving.

For example, the Holiday Inn wished to launch a new string of luxury hotels called "CROWNE PLAZA."

It wasn't long until people were complaining about the prices because they had grown used to the lower prices of a Holiday Inn.

Also, people didn't believe the Holiday Inn was capable of producing a luxury hotel because they had only produced low-cost efficiency hotels in the past.

As a result, Holiday Inn decided to conceal their company name in all future branding and marketing efforts, and very quickly, the Crowne Plaza took-off as a premier destination for traveling professionals.

The Holiday Inn realized people associated their brand with low prices, and so they needed a new (Sub) Brand to promote a luxury hotel.

Toyota deliberately does not add their logo to their Lexus cars.

This is because, according to Toyota, in the minds of the market, Toyota summons feelings of low cost fuel efficient cars for the masses.

Not exactly the recipe for a luxury brand.

However, when Toyota wants people to think of Lexus, they want people to think of an even more fuel-efficient, roomier, luxury vehicle that only the upper class can afford.

A new Prius costs anywhere from $23,475. A very nice, fuel efficient low cost vehicle for the masses!

A new Lexus costs around $37,825. Clearly Toyota has intended Lexus to be their luxury sub-brand.

The key to selling specific solutions to specific people is going to rely on your ability to brand each of your diverse solutions individually.

Take a look at some of the products Proctor and Gamble (P&G) produces, promotes and individually brands:

P&G also has an individual website for each brand as well.

Also, P&G retains the ability for each brand to go as deep as possible for each individual solution it serves.

For example, there are several different types of Head and Shoulders to choose from, all with specific solutions to dandruff.

Why Sub-Branding Is Critical to Your Marketing

Take a look at these 2 screen captures from 2 different law firm websites.

The "blue" firm offers Criminal Law, Personal Injury, Real Estate Law and Family Law.

The "green" firm has one brand and one specialty: Personal Injury.

This firm has less than 10 attorneys, and almost 3x's more legal "specialties" than legal staff.

This firm wants to own personal injury, so who would you hire if you slipped and fell (other things being equal)?

The "blue" firm has done a great job of showing they are the Jack of all Trades, master of none!

The green firm is just like P&G, in that they go very deep on this brand, offering multiple types of personal injury legal services.

The blue firm could easily be just as specialized, and attractive to specific markets by using Sub-Brands.

After all, for all we know, the green firm is offering just as many legal services as the blue firm, but they could be Sub-Branding each one!

How to Sub-Brand Your Business

So, now you have the job of branding each of your offerings, based on price, location, specialty, etc.

This task is no different than branding your original company.

However, now you have the ability to create a specific brand name, logo, website and ads that own your particular market, and solutions.

For example:

> If you offer music lessons to adults and kids, now you can offer these separately, and only offer lessons to kids on certain days, and adults on others. Then create one marketing program to reach the kids (parents), and another to reach adults looking for lessons.

> If you sell car parts and boat parts, create one marketing program for the car parts, and one for the boat parts.

> If you sell tree removal and landscaping services, create one marketing program for the landscaping, and one for tree removal.

> If you have caretakers for the elderly and the injured, create one marketing program for elderly caretakers and another for the injury caretakers.

> If you do commercial and residential heating and air conditioning, create one marketing program for commercial and another for the residential.

You can promote anything to anyone, but it must seem as though the solution being promoted was made primarily for one problem, and one group of people.

Yes, of course you can find some success being a Jack of all Trades, but not nearly as much as much as you can find being a perceived Master of ONE. Just ask Proctor and Gamble.

Make your marketing and branding the leader of everything you do, because everything else is a swap meet.

WANT MORE ADVICE LIKE THIS EVERY SINGLE WEEK?

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